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2006

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  • Don Pettit Goes to Antarctica

    Dec. 11, 2006

    Astronaut Don Pettit has just landed in the meteorite-rich ice fields of Antarctica where he plans to launch a series of edgy and entertaining science experiments to be shared with the general public.

  • Planets around Dead Stars

    April 5, 2006

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has found a disk of dusty debris surroundung a long-dead star. It is the kind of disk where planets are born, raising the possibility that second-generation planets can form around stars after they go supernova.

  • Solar Storm Warning

    March 10, 2006

    This week researchers announced that a storm is coming--the most intense solar maximum in fifty years.

  • Hard-nosed Advice to Lunar Prospectors

    May 22, 2006

    A 22-year veteran of prospecting and mining on Earth has some no-nonsense advice for lunar explorers.

  • Long Range Solar Forecast

    May 10, 2006

    The Sun's Great Conveyor Belt has slowed to a record-low crawl, which has important implications for future solar activity: Solar Cycle 25 peaking in 2022 could be one of the weakest in centuries.

  • A Growing Intelligence around Earth

    Oct. 26, 2006

    A satellite orbiting Earth is learning to think for itself. This artificial intelligence offers a powerful new way to study Earth, and it may prove useful on other planets, too.

  • SMART-1 to Crash the Moon

    Aug. 30, 2006

    A European spaceship is about to crash into the Moon. Amateur astronomers may be able to observe the impact.

  • Electric Hurricanes

    Jan. 9, 2006

    Three of the most powerful hurricanes of 2005 were filled with mysterious lightning.

  • Is The MoonStill Alive?

    Nov. 9, 2006

    Conventional wisdom says The Moonis dead. Conventional wisdom may be wrong. Today in the journal Nature, a team of scientists announced evidence for fresh geologic activity on the Moon.

  • Venus Meets a Planet Named George

    April 11, 2006

    This month, Venus can guide you to a naked-eye planet that ancient astronomers inexplicably failed to see.